Joel Cardella

The CIS Critical Security Controls Series

Blog Post created by Joel Cardella Employee on Apr 19, 2017

What are the CIS Critical Security Controls?

 

The Center for Internet Security (CIS) Top 20 Critical Security Controls (previously known as the SANS Top 20 Critical Security Controls), is an industry-leading way to answer your key security question: “How can I be prepared to stop known attacks?” The controls transform best-in-class threat data into prioritized and actionable ways to protect your organization from today’s most common attack patterns.

 

Achievable Implementation of the CIS Critical Security Controls

 

The interesting thing about the critical security controls is how well they scale to work for organizations of any size, from very small to very large. They are written in easy to understand business language, so non-security people can easily grasp what they do. They cover many parts of an organization, including people, processes and technology. As a subset of the priority 1 items in the NIST 800-53 special publication, they are also highly relevant and complimentary to many established frameworks.

 

Leveraging Rapid7's expertise to assist your successful implementation

 

As part of a Rapid7 managed services unit, the Security Advisory Services team at Rapid7 specializes in security assessments for organizations. Using the CIS Critical Security Controls (formerly the SANS 20 Critical Controls) as a baseline, the team assesses and evaluates strengths and gaps, and makes recommendations on closing those gaps.

 

The Security Advisory Services team will be posting a blog series on each of the controls. These posts are based on our experience over the last two years of our assessment activity with the controls, and how we feel each control can be approached, implemented and evaluated. If you are interested in learning more about the CIS Critical Controls, stay tuned here as we roll out posts weekly. Thanks for your interest and we look forward to sharing our knowledge with you!

 

The definitive guide of all CIS Critical Security Controls

As the blog series expands, we’ll use this space to keep a running total of all the 20 CIS Critical Controls. Check back here to stay updated on each control.

 

Control 1: Inventory of Authorized and Unauthorized Devices

This control is split into 6 focused sections relating to network access control, automation and asset management. The control specifically addresses the need for awareness of what’s connected to your network, as well as the need for proper internal inventory management and management automation. Implementing inventory control is probably the least glamorous way to improve a security program, but if it's done right it reduces insider threat and loss risks, cleans up the IT environment and improves the other 19 controls. Learn more.

 

Control 2: Inventory of Authorized and Unauthorized Software

The second control is split into 4 sections, each dealing with a different aspect of software management. Much like Control 1, this control addresses the need for awareness of what’s running on your systems and network, as well as the need for proper internal inventory management. The CIS placed these controls as the "top 2" in much the same way that the NIST Cybersecurity Framework addresses them as "priority 1" controls on the 800-53 framework; inventory and endpoint-level network awareness is critical to decent incident response, protection and defense. Learn more.

Control 3: Secure Configurations for Hardware & Software

This control deals with Secure Configurations for Hardware & Software. The Critical Controls are numbered in a specific way, following a logical path of building foundations while you gradually improve your security posture and reduce your exposure. Controls 1 and 2 are foundational to understanding what inventory you have. The next step, Control 3, is all about shrinking that attack surface by securing the inventory in your network. Learn more.

 

Control 4: Continuous Vulnerability Assessment & Remediation

Organizations operate in a constant stream of new security information: software updates, patches, security advisories, threat bulletins, etc. Understanding and managing vulnerabilities has become a continuous activity and requires a significant amount of time, attention and resources. Attackers have access to the same information, but have significantly more time on their hands. This can lead to them taking advantage of gaps between the appearance of new knowledge and remediation activities. Control 4 challenges you to understand why vulnerability management and remediation is important to your overall security maturity. Learn more.

 

Control 5: Controlled Use of Administrative Privilege

The ultimate goal of an information security program is to reduce risk. Often, hidden risks run amok in organizations that just aren’t thinking about risk in the right way. Control 5 of the CIS Critical Security Controls can be contentious, can cause bad feelings, and is sometimes hated by system administrators and users alike. It is, however, one of the controls that can have the largest impact on risk.  Discover how reducing or controlling administrative privilege and access can reduce the risk of an attacker comprising your sensitive information. Learn more.

 

Control 6: Maintenance, Monitoring and Analysis of Audit Logs

This control has six sections which cover everything from NTP configuration, to verbose logging of traffic from network devices to how the organization can best leverage a SIEM for a consolidated view and action points, and how often reports need to be reviewed for anomalies. Learn more.

 

Control 7: Email and Web Browser Protection

Critical Control 7 has eight sections that cover the basics of browser and email client safety, secure configuration and mail handling at the server level. The control pays specific attention to concepts like scripting and active component limiting in browsers and email clients, attachment handling, configuration, URL logging, filtering and whitelisting. The premise of the control is fairly straightforward: browser and email client security are critically important for low-level risk mitigation. Learn more.

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