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2017
egypt

Metasploit Wrapup

Posted by egypt Employee Mar 24, 2017

Faster, Meterpreter, KILL! KILL!

You can now search for and kill processes by name in Meterpreter with the new pgrep and pkill commands. They both have flags similar to the older ps command, allowing you to filter by architecture (-a), user (-u), or to show only child processes of the current session's process (-c). We've also added a -x flag to find processes with an exact match instead of a regex, if you're into that.

 

Fun with radiation

radio-stylin.jpg

Craig Smith has been killing it lately with all his hardware exploitation techniques. Check out his post from earlier this week for details of his latest work on integrating radio reconaissance with Metasploit via the HWBridge, including crafting and examining radio frequency packets, brute force via amplitude modulation, and more!

 

Java web things

 

This update includes modules for two fun Java things: Struts2 and WebSphere.

 

Struts is a Java web application framework often deployed on Tomcat, but it can run on any of the various servlet containers out there. The bug is in an error handler. Basically, if the Content-Type header sent by the client is malformed, it will cause an exception and send a stack trace back to the client. As part of its rendering process, Struts will treat the value of the header as part of a template. Templates can contain Object-Graph Navigation Language (OGNL) expressions meaning we get full code execution as the user running the web process. The exploit for this drops a file and runs it so your shells can strut their stuff.

 

WebSphere is an application server manager. It is particularly interesting because it is often used to deploy code to clusters of application servers, which means popping one box can potentially give you code execution on dozens more.

 

You used to pwn me on my cell phone

 

While MMS messages aren't as common of a phishing vector as email, they can potentially be highly successful late at night when you need those shells. Now you can send SMS and MMS messages with Metasploit, using any SMTP server including GMail or Yahoo servers. Pair this with a malicious attachment such as the one generated by android/fileformat/adobe_reader_pdf_js_interface, or a link to the Stagefright browser exploit (android/browser/stagefright_mp4_tx3g_64bit), and get that holla back.

 

New Modules

 

Exploit modules (6 new)

Auxiliary and post modules (10 new)

 

Get it

 

As always, you can update to the latest Metasploit Framework with msfupdate and you can get more details on the changes since the last blog post from GitHub:

 

To install fresh, check out the open-source-only Nightly Installers, or the binary installers which also include the commercial editions.

Currently, phishing is seen as one of the largest infiltration points for businesses around the globe, but there is more to social engineering than just phishing. Attackers may use email and USB keys to deliver malicious files to users in the hopes of gaining access to an organization’s network. Users that are likely unaware that unsolicited files, such as a Microsoft Word document with a macro, may be malicious and can be a major risk to an organization. Metasploit Pro can assist in the education of employees about these attack vectors.

 

Metasploit Pro’s Social Engineering functionality is often used for its phishing capabilities, but it has other options - such as USB key drops and emailing of malicious files - that are able to obtain sessions on a target’s device. As part of an internal training engagement or penetration test, these features will give more insight into the organization’s defenses against social engineering attacks. This post will cover emailing malicious files utilizing the current Microsoft Word macro file format module.

 

To begin, start a new custom campaign and configure your email starting with the email header and target list, similar to a phishing campaign. For Attack Type, select Attach File, give the attachment a name and select File format exploit.

 

Screen Shot 2017-03-17 at 10.55.18 AM.jpg

 

Search for “macro” and select “Microsoft Office Word Malicious Macro Execution”. This will create a Microsoft Word document with a macro that will deliver a payload and open a shell back to Metasploit Pro. Configure your target settings (I’ll be using the OS X Python target for this example) and payload options. Then use the “BODY” field for the content of the Word document. (You can use plain text or xml formatted data, which will be injected between the <p> and </p> tags of the Word xml document.) And click OK.

 

Screen Shot 2017-03-17 at 10.40.45 AM.jpg

 

Click “NEXT” and format your email. Save your changes and configure your email server if you haven’t done so already.

 

Launch your campaign and the email(s) will be sent to all the members of your target list and a listener will be opened for the payload. The recipients will need to enable macros in order for the payload to launch. All those that enable the macro on the specified platform will have a shell that connects back to your Metasploit instance.

 

Screen Shot 2017-03-17 at 11.03.25 AM.jpg

 

Your campaign findings will list the number of targets, recipients that opened the email and number of sessions opened. If any sessions are opened, you’ll be able to interact with that session as you would any others via the Sessions page.

 

Screen Shot 2017-03-17 at 10.49.25 AM.jpeg

 

And there you have it. Metasploit has successfully sent malicious files and opened sessions on remote targets via the Social Engineering feature without attempting a phish.

 

For more on the Microsoft Office Word Malicious Macro Execution module, see sinn3r’s post here: https://community.rapid7.com/community/metasploit/blog/2017/03/08/attacking-micr osoft-office-openoffice-with-metasploit-macro-exploits

 

Interested in learning more about Metasploit Pro’s phishing capabilities? Watch the video below to see how easy it is to build a phishing campaign targeting your users to test their ability to detect malicious emails:

 

 

 

The rise of the Internet of Things

We spend a lot of time monitoring our corporate networks. We have many tools to detect strange behaviors. We scan for vulnerabilities. We measure our exposure constantly. However, we often fail to recognize the small (and sometimes big) Internet of Things (IoT) devices that are all around our network, employees, and employees’ homes. Somewhat alarmingly – considering their pervasiveness — these devices aren’t always the easiest to test.

 

Though often difficult, it is technically possible to find and identify some of these IoT devices via their Ethernet side connection. But that doesn’t always give us a full picture of the risk these devices present to consumers or organizations. When assessing only Ethernet connected devices you can miss the wireless world that can have a major impact on the security of your organization. Wireless systems often control alarm systems, surveillance monitoring, door access, server room HVAC controls, and many other areas.

 

Which leaves us with one very critical question: how do you really determine the risk of these devices?

 

Let’s start with the basics:

  • What do these connected devices do?
  • What is the range of exposure of these devices?
  • Does the device have wireless capabilities?

 

Traditionally, we often perform perimeter scans of our 802.11 wireless networks to ensure our Access Points are secure and the network bleed isn’t too large. We can monitor these Access Points (APs) to create overlap in case one goes down or gets interference from a nearby kitchen microwave.

 

However, if you’re asking yourself, “but what about the rest of the wireless spectrum?” that’s exactly the position we found ourselves in.

 

Radio, radio, everywhere

Chances are your company and employees are already using many other radio frequencies (RFs) outside of the standard 802.11 network for various reasons. Perhaps you have a garage door with a wireless opener? Company vehicle key fobs? Not to mention RFID card readers, wireless security systems, Zigbee controlled lights, or HVAC systems.

 

What are the ranges for these devices? Are they encrypted or protected? What happens when they receive interference? Do they fail in a closed or open state?

 

The inability to effectively answer these questions (easily or even at all) is the very reason we are releasing the RFTransceiver extension for Metasploit’s Hardware Bridge, and why we think this will be a critical tool for security researchers and penetration testers in understanding the actual attack surface.

 

Now, security teams will be able to perform a much broader assessment of a company’s true security posture. They will be able to test physical security controls and better understand when foreign IoT and other devices are brought onto the premises.

 

Sunlight is the best disinfectant

Much of the activity undertaken in the name of security research can be contentious, divisive, or hard to understand. This is certainly true of RF testing, an area of research becoming both more prevalent and increasingly necessary as we see more and more technologies leveraging RF communications.

 

The most common criticism of any technology created for the purpose of security testing is that bad guys could use it to do bad things. The most common response from the security research community is that the bad guys are already doing bad things, and that it’s only when we understand what they’re doing, can effectively replicate it, and demonstrate the potential impact of attacks, that we can take the necessary steps to stop them. Sunlight is the best disinfectant.

 

This is the logic behind Metasploit, as well as what drives Rapid7’s extensive vulnerability research efforts. It is also the reasoning behind the RFTransceiver. We strongly believe that RF testing is an incredibly important – though currently often overlooked – component of vulnerability testing. We believe that failing to test the usage of radio frequency in products puts people and organizations at risk. We also believe the importance of RF testing will continue to escalate as the IoT ecosystem further expands.

 

To provide an example of this kind of testing, in 2016, Rapid7’s Jay Radcliffe disclosed vulnerabilities in Johnson & Johnson’s Animas OneTouch Ping insulin pump. The popular pump has a blood glucose meter that serves as a remote control via radio frequency in a proprietary wireless management protocol. Communications between the pump and the remote control are sent in cleartext, rather than being encrypted. This creates an opportunity for an attacker with the right technical skills and resources, opportunity, and motive to spoof the Meter Remote and trigger unauthorized insulin injections.

 

While Jay considered the likelihood of an attacker exploiting these vulnerabilities in the wild to be quite low, it could seriously harm a patient using the technology. Fortunately, Jay’s research uncovered the problem and he was able to work with Johnson & Johnson to notify patients and advise them of ways to mitigate the risk. Without RF testing, these vulnerabilities would have continued to go unnoticed, and patients would not have the opportunity to make informed choices to protect themselves.

 

How it works

Just one quick author’s note before we get into the ‘how-to’ portion. Rapid7 does not sell the hardware required to perform RF testing. The required hardware can be found at any number of places, including Hacker Warehouse, Hak5, or any electronics store that carries software defined radios or RF transmitter hobbyist equipment.

 

With the RFTransceiver, security pros have the ability to craft and monitor different RF packets to properly identify and access a company’s wireless systems beyond Ethernet accessible technologies.

 

The first RFTransceiver release supports the TI cc11xx Low-Power Sub-1GHz RF Transceiver. The RFTransceiver extension makes it possible to tune your device to identify and demodulate signals. You can even create short bursts of interference to identify failure states. This release provides a full API that is compatible with the popular RfCat python framework for the TI cc11xx chipsets. If you have existing programs that use RfCat you should be able to port those into Metasploit without much difficulty. This release comes with two post modules: an Amplitude Modulation based brute forcer (rfpwnon) and a generic transmitter (transmitter).

 

How to use RFTransceiver

Using the new RFTransceiver extension requires the purchase of an RfCat-compatible device like the Yard Stick One. Then download the latest RfCat drivers, included with those drivers you will find rfcat_msfrelay. This is the Metasploit Framework relay server for RfCat. Run this on the system with the RfCat compatible device attached.

 

Then you can connect with the hardware bridge:

RFTranceiver Usage

$ ./msfconsole -q

msf > use auxiliary/client/hwbridge/connect

msf auxiliary(connect) > run

 

[*] Attempting to connect to 127.0.0.1...

[*] Hardware bridge interface session 1 opened (127.0.0.1 -> 127.0.0.1) at 2017-02-16 20:04:57 -0600

[+] HWBridge session established

[*] HW Specialty: {"rftransceiver"=>true}  Capabilities: {"cc11xx"=>true}

[!] NOTICE:  You are about to leave the matrix.  All actions performed on this hardware bridge

[!]          could have real world consequences.  Use this module in a controlled testing

[!]          environment and with equipment you are authorized to perform testing on.

[*] Auxiliary module execution completed

msf auxiliary(connect) > sessions

 

Active sessions

===============

 

  Id  Type                   Information    Connection

  --  ----                   -----------    ----------

  1   hwbridge cmd/hardware  rftransceiver  127.0.0.1 -> 127.0.0.1 (127.0.0.1)

 

msf auxiliary(connect) > sessions -i 1

[*] Starting interaction with 1...

 

hwbridge > status

[*] Operational: Yes

[*] Device: YARDSTICKONE

[*] FW Version: 450

[*] HW Version: 0348

 

To learn more about the RFTransceiver, you can download the latest Metasploit here: https://www.rapid7.com/products/metasploit/download/community/

Spend the summer with Metasploit

 

I'm proud to announce that the Metasploit Project has been accepted as a mentor organization in the Google Summer of Code! For those unfamiliar with the program, their about page sums it up nicely:

Google Summer of Code is a global program focused on introducing students to open source software development. Students work on a 3 month programming project with an open source organization during their break from university.

 

This is an amazing program that helps remove the financial barriers of contributing to Open Source. Basically how it works is you (a university student) work on an Open Source project over the summer (12 weeks) with a mentor who has experience working on that project. As long as you keep at it and hit your milestones, Google gives you money along the way based on performance. Pay your rent, stock the fridge, get coffee, whatever.

 

Open Source is the heart of the Metasploit community, but it's more than that to me. It's the means by which we, as programmers, can help improve the world a little bit at a time. We all stand on the shoulders of giants, building greater things because others before us have built great things. Like many OSS contributors, I personally started contributing to an Open Source project because it allowed me to get my work done more efficiently. By working together on Open Source, we can help others get their work done too, and enable them to build greater things. By working on Metasploit in particular, you will be helping to democratize offensive security, improving the world by giving everyone access to the same techniques that bad guys use, so they can be better understood and mitigated.

 

If Metasploit is not where your heart lies, I encourage you to consider contributing to one of the other GSoC security projects.

 

We have a list of project ideas that will have you writing some awesome code for great justice. Most everything requires at least a little Ruby, but if you're more comfortable in C or Python, there are options for you as well. Whatever you choose, I'm super excited to see what you will accomplish.

 

Important dates to know:

  • Student Application Period - March 20, 2017 - April 3, 2017
  • Student Projects Announced - May 4, 2017

 

If you are interested in participating, you should definitely check out the rest of the GSoC timeline. You will need to apply to us and also through GSoC's application page when it goes live next week on March 20th.

 

So please come work with us. Be the shoulders others can stand on.

William Webb

Metasploit Weekly Wrapup

Posted by William Webb Employee Mar 10, 2017


interrupt.jpeg

The last couple of weeks in the infosec world have appeared busier, and buzzier, than most others.  It seems almost futile to pry everyone away from the current drama--that being the bombshell revelation that intelligence agencies collect intelligence--long enough to have them read our dev blog.  Regardless, we've been busy ourselves.  And if you're the least bit like me, you could probably use a quick respite from the cacophony.  Keeping up with all the noise is enough to make anyone feel like Ricky:

 

rickym.png

This is Ricky.  Don't be like Ricky.

 

Features and Fixes

 

There are few things worse than getting a Meterpreter session on a host, only to find yourself unable to download large files that you might be interested in because your connection is spotty.  Unfortunately, download timeouts in such sessions have been a reality for as long as Meterpreter has been around.  Thankfully, a recent patch by Pearce Barry goes a long way to alleviate said issues by providing more fault tolerance to adverse network conditions.  I personally tested this on over 1GB of data across a network link with 20% packet loss, and while it felt like I was using CompuServe once again, it delivered the goods.

 

Other issues addressed include a fix by mrjefftang for an issue in BrowserExploitServer.  Instead of delivering the obfuscated Javascript from JSObfu, raw Javascript was mistakenly being sent.  Good catch.  Also, a major rewrite of the reverse_shell_jcl payload was submitted by bigendiansmalls and merged.  Functionally, it behaves the same as the previous iteration; however, the actual code is much cleaner and easier to maintain.  So if you haven't tried your hand at IBM mainframe hacking, it's now even easier to jump right in.

 

A Requiem for Meterpreter Scripts

 

We obliterated what we believe to be the last vestige of Meterpreter scripts in framework.  In their time, an exploit module may have used migrate -f to automatically migrate the session to another process on the target.  This is now handled by 'post/windows/manage/priv_migrate', and has been for some time.  The old migrate -f argument set in InitialAutoRunScript was pointed at this new module; however, there's been a few hiccups over the last few weeks.  That's been corrected, and all should now be right with Windows process migration.  Note: This doesn't mean that your personal custom scripts will stop working. Scripts are still a handy way to bust out a prototype to get stuff done quickly without needing to care about the reliability requirements of a post module.

 

In other assorted bugfix news, Brendan Watters resolved an issue that occurred when sorting tables from auxiliary modules when the results contained both IPv4 and IPv6 addresses.  We also updated Metasploit to use the latest Nexpose client libraries, so it's now able to validate that it's communicating with a trusted Nexpose instance via preconfigured SSL certificates.

 

Docker!

 

One final item in this release was the addition of a basic Dockerfile and Docker Compose configuration.  With support for Docker, you can now isolate your Metasploit instances, and it allows you to both quickly and easily setup new testing and development environments.  Plans are in the works to publish the container to hub.docker.com, and users will be able to deploy new installations of Metasploit Framework just as easily as they would other applications using Docker.

 

New Modules

 

Exploit modules (5 new)

Auxiliary and post modules (2 new)

 

Get it

 

As always, you can update to the latest Metasploit Framework with msfupdate and you can get more details on the changes since the last blog post from GitHub:

 

 

To install fresh, check out the open-source-only Nightly Installers, or the binary installers which also include the commercial editions.

 

That's all for now.  Stay tuned, as we have several interesting projects in the works that should be debuting in the coming weeks.

office_icon.pngIt is fair to say that Microsoft Office and OpenOffice are some of the most popular applications in the world. We use them for writing papers, making slides for presentations, analyzing sales or financial data, and more. This software is so important to businesses that, even in developing countries, workers that are proficient in an Office suite can make a decent living based on this skill alone.

 

Unfortunately, high popularity for software also means more high-value targets in the eyes of an attacker, and malware-infested Office macros are like an irritating rash that doesn't go away for IT professionals.

 

A macro is a feature that allows users to create automated processes inside of a document used by software like Microsoft Word, Excel, or PowerPoint. This is used to enhance user experience, increase productivity, or automate otherwise manual tasks. But, in other words, it executes code. What kind of code? Well, pretty much whatever you want, even a Meterpreter session!

 

Macro attacks are nothing new or unusual. A typical attack usually involves embedding malicious macro code in an Office document, sending it to the victim, and asking him or her very nicely to enable that code. The saddest part isn't how lame the attack is, since you are basically begging the victim to run your malware. It's that people have been falling for this trick for decades!

 

The impact of such attacks should not be underestimated. In fact, malicious macros are often used in ransomware, and other high-profile breaches. For example, the Cerber Ransomware was a macro attack against Office 365 that put millions of users at risk. Since Office 365 is extremely popular in businesses, we expect it to be one of malicious macros' favorite audiences for quite some time.

 

Yup, I think people call that social-engineering, and apparently it always works. I figured: "ok, why not, a shell is a shell. Let me write some exploits for these"... and that's how Metasploit's macro exploits were born:

 

The Microsoft Office Macro Exploit

This Microsoft Office macro exploit is specifically written for the Word document format. It has been tested against these environments:

 

  • Microsoft Office 2010 for Windows
  • Microsoft Office 2013 for Windows
  • Microsoft Office 2016 for Windows
  • Microsoft Office Word for Mac OS X 2011

 

The following demonstrates how to create a macro exploit for Microsoft Office for OS X, setting up a handler, as well as obtaining a session:

 

msft_osx_macro_demo.gif

 

If you actually have a valid certificate to sign the malicious macro, you can actually apply that by using Microsoft Office to sign it. Having a valid cert will not have the "Enable Content" prompt, Microsoft Office will just execute your code by default. However, this is obviously only ideal for internal use. Good certificates are expensive.

 

The OpenOffice Macro Exploit

The Apache OpenOffice macro exploit is specifically written for OpenOffice Writer (odt). It has been tested against these environments:

 

  • Windows with Powershell support (which should be the case since Windows 7)
  • Ubuntu Linux (which ships LibreOffice by default)
  • OS X

 

Unlike Microsoft, OpenOffice actually does not want to open any documents with macros, which means in order to attack, the victim has to manually do the following in advance:

 

1. Choose Tools -> Options -> Security

2. Click the Macro Security button

3. Change the security level to either medium to low.

 

If the security level is set to medium, a prompt is presented to the user to either allow or disallow the macro. If set to low, the macro will run without warning.

 

Now let's talk about how to use the exploit. The design for it is actually different than the Microsoft one: not only will it create the malicious document file, the module will also spawn a web server, and a payload handler. The purpose of the web server is when the victim runs the macro, the malicious code will download the final payload from our web server, and execute it. The following demonstrates how to use the exploit:

 

openoffice_demo.gif

 

Exploit Customization

Although the Metasploit macro exploits work right out of the box, some cosmetic customizations are probably necessary to make the document look more legit and believable.

 

To do this, you will need a copy of either Microsoft Office or OpenOffice (depending on the type of exploit you're using), and then:

 

  1. Generate the exploit
  2. Move the exploit to a platform with Office that can edit the document
  3. Open the document with Office, do your editing there. When you're done, simply click save. As long as you're not modifying the macro, it should still work

 

Time to Play!

Congratulations, young grasshopper! If you've read this far, and have not fallen asleep, then you are ready to start your journey of sweet Office macro pwnage. But before you leave, if you have never used Metasploit - a cyber weapon forged in the fires of um... Austin, Texas - then you shall download it here. If you already possess such power, then we strongly recommend you run msfupdate.

 

Go now, embrace your destiny of pwnage, and let that glory be yours with Metasploit Office macro exploits.

Penetration testing with Metasploit made easy.

 

Millions of IT professionals all over the world want to get into the hot field of security, and Metasploit is a great place to start. Metasploit Framework is free, used by more penetration testers than any other tool, and helps you understand security from the attackers perspective. There’s one problem: it's hard to use Metasploit without vulnerable services to play against.

 

To help, the Metasploit team has created vulnerable OS images (Metasploitable2 and Metasploitable3), each containing dozens of vulnerable services that a user can cut his/her teeth with. However, these images contain small subset of the thousands of Metasploit modules available for users. You may wonder why we don't have vulnerable services available for testing and training every module. The reason is simple: it can be very time-consuming and difficult to configure vulnerable services. First, you have to obtain the vulnerable software, and then install, and configure each service. Sometimes, older software is simply unavailable for download, either because it is too old, or because the vendor removed it for security reasons. Depending on the software, setting up even one vulnerable service can take hours, if not days. While Metasploitable VMs makes the job of setting up your first vulnerability lab much easier, it is still not simple.

 

We developed the Vulnerable Services Emulator to fill this gap. It is a framework that makes it easy to emulate the vulnerable services for penetration testing purposes.  Right now, it emulates over 100 vulnerable services, covering things like compromising credentials, getting a shell from the victim, and more. After going through module exercises, users can learn details about security vulnerabilities and how to test them, and are encouraged to continue to learn and play with Metasploit’s capabilities. It is like a high-interaction honeypot, but specially tuned to be exploitable.

 

This tool is very easy to install and use.  All you need to run it is a working Perl installation for your favorite OS (Windows, Mac or Linux). Directions for installing the tool, which only takes a minute, are on Github page for this project.

 

In addition to learning, the emulator can be used to perform system testing on Metasploit modules themselves, providing feedback to the community on how to make modules more effective. But, the ultimate goal of the project is to help the community learn and make it even easier to get into penetration testing and Metasploit!

 

Example Usage

 

Here we are emulating a vulnerable printer service that is targeted by the Metasploit module exploits/windows/iis/ms01_023_printer.  The IP address 0.0.0.0 means we will bind to 0.0.0.0, and be accepting connections on any network interface. The default IP to bind is “127.0.0.1” which only connects from the same host. This is more secure when your Metasploit instance is installed on the same server.

 

Screen Shot 2017-02-26 at 5.55.50 PM.png

 

Here is the Metasploit configuration, which is configured to target the emulated service. You can see a session is established.  Note that the commands are actually executed on the target, so please run this emulator in a safe environment if you don't want it to be owned :-)

Screen Shot 2017-02-26 at 6.00.57 PM.png

 

That’s pretty easy right? What’s even nicer about this framework how easy it is to develop a new emulated vulnerable service. We know developers have very different preferences on programming languages, so instead of implementing the vulnerable services using a particular language, the framework describes vulnerable service interactions in JSON. It’s not a programming language per se but it has enough logic for service emulation. The following is the description for the vulnerable printer service.

 

Simple JSON description on an emulated service

"exploits/windows/iis/ms01_023_printer": {

  "desc": "set payload windows/shell_reverse_tcp",

  "seq": [

    ["regex", "GET http:\/\/.*\/NULL.printer?"],

    ["HTTP/1.1 200 OK\r\nContent-Length: 0\r\n\r\n", ["action", ["connect", ":4444"]]]

  ]

},

 

In the above JSON code, the most important part is the “seq” section, which represents the sequence of messages used for the exploit.  It has an even number of entries (in this case, there are 2 entries). The odd-numbered entries are conditions. When a message comes in, it’s matched against the odd-numbered entries starting from the first; when there is a match, the corresponding even-numbered entries will be the action.  Typically, the action involves sending a response.  But it can also include an action such as making a new connection (like connecting back as a metepreter session in our case). This makes it easy to emulate vulnerable services and trigger them to set up a connection back to attacker.

 

At the core of the project, we implemented a framework (an interpreter) to execute the JSON based service description file. The current implementation is in Perl, but you can implement the framework in other programming languages of your choice.

 

The github project, we will have more technical details on the tool and its usage. It’s our hope that this tool can help you to enjoy a better learning experience in the exciting field of security and eventually become a security professional. Be sure to let us know if you have any feedback!

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