todb

Metasploit, [REDACTED] Edition

Blog Post created by todb Employee on Apr 1, 2017

Why should [REDACTED] have all the fun with spiffy codenames for their exploits? As of today, Metasploit is taking a page from [REDACTED], and equipping all Metasploit modules with equally fear-and-awe-inspiring codenames. Sure, there are catchy names for vulnerabilities -- we remember you fondly, Badblock -- but clearly, unique names for exploits is where the real action is at, especially when you're [REDACTED][REDACTED][REDACTED][REDACTED][REDACTED].

 

So, instead of running boring old 'exploit/windows/smb/ms08_067_netapi', now you can don your onyx tactleneck, and use CRISPYTRUFFLE like the international man of mystery that you are.

 

Need to scan for telnet banners? Sure, you could use 'auxiliary/scanner/telnet/telnet_version', like some kind of civilian, or you can be a shadowy puppetmaster and unleash the awesome power of HIDDENBOYFRIEND.

 

Or, maybe you're looking to deploy one of Metasploit's payloads as a standalone executable, given to your operative in the field. Once you've lost your tail and met your contact in a darkened, rain-slicked alley, you can hand off a USB key loaded up with VENGEFULPONY, and trust he'll do what it takes to get back across the border.

 

In order to enable these ultra-top-secret codenames, you'll need to run a fresh checkout of the development version of the Metasploit Framework. If you're on one of the binary versions of Metasploit, they'll be getting these codenames as well, so you can check if they're available by setting the environment variable DANGERZONE, like so:

 

$ DANGERZONE=1 ./msfconsole -q

 

msf > use CRISPYTRUFFLE

msf exploit(ms08_067_netapi) >

 

So take a moment today, April 1st, to read yourself into [REDACTED] by visiting http://www.5z8.info/eid-howto_j0b9mh_openme.exe. Make sure you're behind at least seven proxies when you do so, since [REDACTED] is probably watching.

Outcomes